Better Bladder Health with Cannabis?

The endocannabinoid system might be one of the most fascinating and most complex regulatory systems of the human body. Unlike many other areas of medicine, where basic domains of influence are well established, the endocannabinoid system represents an open, unsettled territory for bold researchers. New effects mediated by the system are being discovered constantly and in some of the most unlikely places. Effects are not limited to activation or deactivation of cannabinoid receptors alone. The system has shown itself capable of affecting the body through other side routes, as exhibited by CBD, which has numerous therapeutic qualities yet a surprisingly low affinity for either type of cannabinoid receptor. As is the case with most scientific research, new questions often arise from unexpected results from other experiments (think post-it notes arising from super glue research). In the case of bladder research, the first studies to indicate that cannabis might be helpful in relieving overactive bladder stemmed from studies of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. MS can frequently lead to bladder spasms and other incontinence issues as muscles deteriorate. Patients using Sativex (a popular extract of cannabis) noted reduced urinary urgency and number of incontinence episodes. This observation lead to a multi-center study involving over 600 patients who self-reported reduction of bladder issues while taking Sativex. While results of the survey indicated a reduction in problems, self-reported studies are only meant as initial inquiries because they are subject to bias, differing standards, poorly-defined language in questionnaires, etc. However, this study none-the-less encouraged researchers…

THC May Help Break Down Harmful Memories

Lately cannabidiol (CBD) has been hogging the therapeutic limelight; it’s an anti-inflammatory, an anti-tumor, and it helps inhibit psychotic behavior. THC, the psychoactive chemical most prized in the recreational community, has been deemed to have less potential for therapeutic use, in part due to the side effects that accompany dosage. For this reason, much clinical research has shifted toward CBD and away from THC. However, THC’s psychedelic, mindset-altering activity is exactly what lends it therapeutic benefits in situations involving memory and fear consolidation. Fear memory consolidation occurs after a painful memory is acquired, and is the process through which that memory is stabilized in the brain. Although not all aspects are understood, we know that the consolidation process involves strengthening synapses the brain deems useful and paring down synapses the brain deems less useful. Aside from this process, memories are also converted from being dependent on the short-term memory region of the brain to being independent of this region and placed in a longer-term storage area. However, memories are also capable of being re-consolidated and forming new associations. To put all of this into practical terms, someone suffering from Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) stemming from military service may initially suffer injury while hearing an unrelated stimulus, such as a warning siren. The brain may then associate the pain and injury with that sound. Unfortunately, as the individual returns to normal society and hears similar sounds, such as ambulance sirens, those memories and fears may resurface, causing additional pain, aggression, and…

Whole Plant CBD More Effective Than Pure CBD?

At Cornerstone, we talk frequently about dosing, not just because it’s important to members, but also because it’s important to us. The end goal is for every patient to experience the maximum benefit of medical cannabis. Although it seems tempting to think that more medicine always means more healing, that’s just not the reality of how cannabinoids are processed in the body. In truth the body’s response is much more complex. Exhibit A: This is a graph that illustrates anti-inflammatory properties of cannabidiol (CBD) at various doses.   You’ll notice that the shape is a bell curve, meaning that in many cases, more CBD could actually equate to less anti-inflammatory help. This is not a graph mistake; it’s a common observation of the effects of CBD. In other words, dose matters. As seen, the greatest effect of CBD will occur at the middle of the curve. Because dosage depends on body fat, tolerance, and a host of other individual factors it is very difficult to advise users on “the most effective dose” for them. Cornerstone can offer you suggestions, but ultimately, individual patients are going to have to discover what amounts and what dosing schedules work for them. What is clear to us though, is that patients may get more out of their medicines by showing restraint. All that aside, wouldn’t it be great if CBD could be given in a preparation that was not dose-dependent? Shouldn’t there be a way to beat the dose curve? This is exactly the question Israeli…

Does Long Term Cannabis Use Make You Dumb?

I vape cannabis several times a day and have no intentions of stopping anytime soon. It’s never slowed my work ethic or turned me into a zombie. Instead, I feel more creative and at peace. I don’t have any life threatening health conditions or chronic pain, and I’ve never been one to take a lot of pharmaceuticals. However, since I’m not a “hippy” by any means, I tend to have a lot of non-cannabis-using friends who occasionally ask me about my frequent cannabis use. Invariably, the question that always comes up is, “…do you think that stuff rots your brain over time? I heard it makes people dumb if they use it too much…” If you’re open about cannabis use, you’ll probably encounter this conversation at least once. Culturally, we’re used to the image of a stoner-burnout, a guy stuck in the 70’s that handles life like Jeff Bridges’ character in The Big Lebowski. We look at these people and we secretly wonder to ourselves, “did smoking cannabis all day every day make them this way? Will I be like that if I continue to use cannabis?” When we talk about the safety of cannabis, we’re really talking about quite a few things. First, there are the things that we know as facts. Fact: It’s damn near impossible to overdose on cannabis. The amount of THC that would be needed to cause an overdose is such a large quantity that the volume alone makes it difficult to do. For instance,…