Real Life Cannabinoid Treatment for Multiple Sclerosis

As a blog concerned with new developments in cannabinoid science, we tend to do a lot of writing about future treatments, or new scientific developments that may eventually lead to treatments. Part of the issue is that large-scale, clinical testing of new cannabinoid based medicine is still years away in a lot of areas, particularly in cancer-related fields. That’s why reading a good, new large-scale study is always exhilarating. In this case, a recent study from the University of Bari in Italy took a look at a large scale, real-world application of a THC/CBD oral spray in treating adults with treatment-resistant Multiple Sclerosis (MS). In the past, we’ve written about treating MS models via lab mice with THC and CBD, and also the theory behind that treatment. So being able to finally see how things play out in real life with real patients is particularly rewarding for us and is yet another confirmation of the efficacy of cannabis based treatments. To review, MS is an auto-immune disease in which the body’s immune system is confused into turning against the body and attacking cells. In particular, MS is caused by the immune system stripping neurons of their outer protective linings, which normally prevent “signals” from being crossed or lost in the brain, both for conscious and unconscious tasks. This stripping eventually results in loss of physical mobility and function and can prevent patients from fulfilling active, healthy lives. Spasticity, which affects about 2/3rds of patients, is particularly problematic. Unfortunately, at this…

Retinal Health and Cannabis- “Seeing” the Difference

Glaucoma was one of the first applications identified for medical cannabis treatment and remains one of the most common medical reasons for prescription. Why? In the 1970’s initial slew of cannabis-centric research, the Journal of the American Medical Association published a finding that individuals who smoked cannabis experienced lower intra-ocular (inner-eye) pressure. This was one of the first significant physiological findings regarding the effect of smoking cannabis. However, more importantly, it seemed to be an answer to glaucoma, a disease in which excess fluid builds up in the eye, causing higher pressure and cell damage. As a result, the study was duplicated often, and the results upheld the initial conclusion that cannabis could be an effective solution. Unfortunately, cannabis research waned in popularity. Once cannabis was culturally cast in the same category as other recreational drugs, the idea that it would ever be prescribed legally for glaucoma lost traction. Fortunately, years later, as we experience a renaissance in both cannabis prescription and cannabis research, a new interest has arisen in the way the endocannabinoid system might be manipulated to treat retinal disease. The endocannabinoid system, as some readers may be familiar with, is the system of cannabinoid receptors, natural cannabinoids that bind to them, and all the enzymes facilitating that process that are found in humans and most mammals. Recently we’ve learned that cannabinoid receptors are more complex than we imagined. Aside from cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2, vanilloid receptors (an entirely different chemical system), and orphan GPR-55 receptors are…

New Role for Cannabinoids in Diabetes Treatment

The endocannabinoid system is one of the biggest sleeper hits of modern science. Despite going ignored until the early 90’s, we’re discovering more and more how vital and essential this system of naturally produced cannabinoids, their receptors, and their enzymes are. From breast cancer pathogenesis to arthritis and pain treatment to neurological issue development, the endocannabinoid system is involved. For this reason, it should come as no surprise to readers that the endocannabinoid system has recently been found to play a role in the pancreas. Specifically, cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) is expressed in beta cells in the pancreas. The primary role of these beta cells is to produce and store insulin, the hormone that reduces blood sugar concentration. Lack of insulin leads to diabetes, which brings a host of related health issues. In multiple studies, CB1 receptors have been found to be able to trigger cell death of these beta cells. Thus, cannabinoid receptor regulation is likely essential to the control and pathogenesis of diabetes, and researchers aim to create new treatments by understanding this signaling. Ideally, researchers could stop beta cell death, preserve natural insulin levels, and therefore prevent or cure diabetes, rather than just supplying the body with externally-produced insulin. Toward that end, a team of researchers from various universities in South Korea has released a new study aimed to identify the mechanism of cannabinoid-mediated cell death in the pancreas. Before starting with animal studies, the team investigated the basic mechanics of cell death in a mouse pancreas…