Nutmeg and …The Endocannabinoid System?

As readers know, we spend a lot of time researching and writing articles about the endocannabinoid system, the system of cannabinoids, cannabinoid receptors, and enzymes found in most mammals. For a medical cannabis dispensary, this might seem a bit counterintuitive: why not focus purely on cannabis? Why not focus the blog on emerging cannabis strains or strain history? Firstly, we take our position as a leading research dispensary seriously. From our intake process to our appointments to the blog, our entire process is designed to go above and beyond what a normal dispensary is equipped to offer. We’re not just concerned with marketing the latest, greatest strains; we’re concerned with your health and your understanding of health. We know that the trust we build with you as a provider is infinitely more valuable than any marketing gimmick. However, secondly, and perhaps more importantly, we understand the potential of the endocannabinoid system. While cannabis represents humanity’s first major interaction and experience with manipulating the endocannabinoid system, it will certainly not be the last. The more we understand about the endocannabinoid system, the more we realize how essential this system is to physical and neurological health. Enter nutmeg. Nutmeg is a spice ground from seeds of the Myristica family of trees indigenous to Indonesia. Like cannabis, nutmeg spice has been used throughout human history for various spiritual, medicinal, and flavoring purposes. Unfortunately, also like cannabis, very little is understood about nutmeg. For instance, while we’ve observed mixed psychedelic effects from excessive nutmeg…

Is Cannabis Addictive?

One of the early concerns that dominated the medical cannabis discussion was over both the addictive potential and long-term effects of cannabis. For decades, it has generally been understood by the medical community that cannabis is not physically addictive but can be psychologically addictive. To differentiate, individuals addicted to alcohol cannot suddenly end consumption without risk of death or serious health consequences, because their bodies have learned to literally need alcohol. In contrast, even a frequent cannabis consumer can end consumption immediately without serious health risk. However, this transition might be severely uncomfortable due to the psychological dependence of cannabis use. Some anti-cannabis advocates and researchers alike have pushed for the notion that this dependence is life-long. Researchers from Geneva, Switzerland recently pressed one step forward to directly answer this question by observing changes in brain chemistry during and after chronic cannabis use. To back up, what is addiction and what causes addiction? As researchers note, “the addictive effects of virtually all drugs…are thought to be mediated through activation of mesolimbic dopamine projections to the nucleus accumbens.” Essentially, a neurotransmitter, dopamine, is activated to a greater degree than normal, causing an increased interaction with the part of the brain that deals with decision making, risk, and reward. Dopamine is responsible for a multitude of signaling tasks, but perhaps the most known and most important job is signaling reward. When a user consumes a drug, dopamine is released in the brain, essentially rewarding the user for consuming the drug and teaching…