Is Inhaling Cannabis Bad for You?

As it stands, cannabis has proven beneficial to one's health in too many ways to list. The cannabinoids contained in cannabis exert their myriad of health effects in particularly gentle ways, and unlike most other pharmaceuticals, cannabis appears to have no toxic limit in healthy adults. Even so, frequent consumers of cannabis may wonder: is inhaling the smoke of anything, even cannabis, good for my lungs? Am I causing long-term damage similar to smoking cigarettes? The short answer: yes, you should avoid inhaling smoke or any burning material as much as possible. The lungs were not made to filter smoke continuously or really at all. For this reason, previous articles on the blog have discussed vaporizers and the importance of using non-combustive methods of consumption (edibles anyone?). Vaporizers not only improve taste of cannabis, but also virtually eliminate damage caused by smoking. Furthermore, vaporizers are generally able to glean a greater medicinal effect from a smaller amount of cannabis. Frequent users should find the financial investment a no-brainer. However, clever readers may also wonder: aside from the physical reality of inhaling burning material, what effects do cannabinoids actually have on the lungs? As it happens, cannabinoid research points to an overwhelmingly positive relationship between cannabinoids and lung health. In fact, while we are generally cautious of making strong statements, this is one area where we can be reasonably certain that the long-term effect of cannabis consumption is positive, at least from the properties inherent in cannabinoids themselves. A September article…

The Endocannabinoid System and Reproductive Health

Evolutionarily speaking, if the endocannabinoid system of receptors and ligands were not critical to human life, it would have disappeared early in the course of human development. If the system is not necessary, humans and mammals that genetically mutated to lack endocannabinoid receptors would have existed, and in fact, would have had better luck as a result of not wasting energy. Although we tend to forget, the body consumes energy by building receptors, producing enzymes, and creating natural endocannabinoids. This energy might otherwise be used for important functions such as repairing muscle or fortifying the immune system. Of course, a clever reader may ask, “What about the appendix? If what you’re saying is true, why hasn’t that disappeared?” Although the appendix no longer serves a function, it did at one point during human development. The appendix is like an old bridge that was once critical and is now unused. It is entirely possible that the endocannabinoid system once played a greater function, however, we’ve already confirmed multiple current functions and our understanding of its importance continues to grow. This month, we’re taking a look at the various ways in which the endocannabinoid system affects the human reproductive system. In the past, we’ve covered the interaction with estrogen and the female reproductive cycle. However, lately we’ve learned that sperm motility and production is associated with the endocannabinoid system as well. In the first area of interaction, cannabinoids affect hypothalamic-pituitary control of reproduction in the brain. In normal sex hormone production, gonadotropin-releasing-hormone…