A Practical Look at Cannabis Extract and Sleep

Estimating the number of individuals suffering from sleep disorder is difficult if only because of the variety of sources. While sleep can be interrupted by chronic pain, as is often the case for arthritis patients, other sources such as gastrointestinal activity, breathing difficulties, epilepsy, Alzheimer’s, etc. can also prevent restful sleep. To date, while multiple over-the-counter sleep medications exist, all have large flaws. Benadryl and other anti-histamines, usually diphenhydramine, are known to have the side effect of sleepiness and are often taken as sleeping pills. However, diphenhydramine can be habit-forming. Melatonin, on the other hand, can help re-enforce natural sleep cycle/rhythm, but can’t overcome serious sleeping barriers. Finally, prescription sleeping medications, such as Ambien, which are much stronger and more resilient, often have semi-psychotic side effects and can produce uncomfortable and sometimes dangerous experiences. While cannabis and cannabinoids may not provide a complete answer, they represent another potential avenue for eliciting sleep, and as a result, the relationship between sleep and the endocannabinoid system should be a priority of researchers. Unfortunately, despite the fact that we all need sleep, we actually understand little about it. We’ve managed to determine that sleep plays an important role in restoring and healing both the body and mind, with the brain passing through several stages of sleep characterized by the pattern of brain waves in each stage. Truly restful sleep seems to be characterized by attainment of the last stage in the sleep cycle, REM. However, much of the specific brain chemistry remains unclear,…

A Lot To “Digest”: Cannabinoids in the Gastrointestinal System

As a society, we are indebted to researchers who’ve dedicated entire lives to investigating less popular subjects. Early on, medical researchers heightened interest in cannabis miffed a lot of the scientific community as a whole, who thought of cannabis as a recreational drug unworthy of study. However, the study of cannabis and its active ingredients lead directly to the discovery of the mammalian endocannabinoid system. While we initially saw this system as an unessential group of cannabinoid receptors, cannabinoids, and enzymes involved in regulating that system, we now understand just how vital it is to the body. Likewise, while we initially thought cannabinoid receptors only played a direct role in bowel inflammation, we now understand that the entire endocannabinoid system plays a major role in the digestive process. Recently, researchers at UC Riverside released an aggregate review of studies involving the endocannabinoid system in relation to the gastrointestinal system. We found this review especially helpful and have summarized important highlights for readers. The full article is free to the public at: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4940133/   Gut Motility To function, the intestine must absorb nutrients but also send food onward. The ability to move food onward is called “motility” and is driven by timed contraction of the intestinal muscle. The gut interacts with the brain to determine the pace of contraction and therefore, food motility. Unfortunately, sometimes the timing of contractions can go haywire. Cannabinoids, whether naturally occurring endocannabinoids or externally administered cannabinoids, have been shown to reduce motility in a dose-dependent matter.…

Keeping It Together: Cannabinoid Receptors Found In Connective Tissue Regions

Cannabinoid receptors are known to be located all throughout the body. Although most abundant in the central and peripheral nervous system and in immune system cells, cannabinoid receptors are also thought to reside in other types of tissues. However, due to the number of possible locations and the number of experiments necessary to establish localization of those receptors, new areas are still being discovered more than two decades after the discovery of the receptors themselves. Why do we care? If we are interested in the medicinal effects of cannabis and cannabinoids, research focusing on the actual effects of cannabinoids and inhibitors may seem more to the point. Regardless of the localization of the receptors, the bottom line is whether the endocannabinoid system can or cannot be a pharmaceutical target for a given medical condition. This assumes that we already know the conditions we are seeking to cure or treat. Building a functional map of the distribution of receptors throughout the body, while time and labor-intensive, will also likely reveal new conditions that may be associated or even be a direct result of endocannabinoid system operation. This year, a research group from the University of Padua in Italy decided to use samples of myofascial tissue to test for the presence of endocannabinoid receptors. Myofascial tissue is essentially an organic mesh of collagen that has a great strength while at the same time is highly flexible. This type of tissue is employed all throughout the body to keep organs compartmentalized as well…