Waking Up with CBD

In the last two articles we discussed the role in which THC and the CB1 cannabinoid receptors present in your body can extend sleep and solve certain sleep disorders. You may have noticed that so far the discussion of CBD has been absent. That is because CBD is thought to have virtually the opposite effect of THC, in that it is thought to increase wakefulness. Although some conditions only require medication at night, many conditions benefit from dosing throughout the day, such as chronic pain and neurological imbalances. As a result, Cornerstone members often pose the question of which strain to medicate with in situations where they need to feel alert and awake. For this reason, discovering the exact effect of CBD is important to the future of medical cannabis. Unfortunately, at this point in time, the evidence is not quite as resounding as that of THC and sleep, and while the basic hypothesis that CBD increases wakefulness has been supported numerous times, the issue has not been fully proved from a scientific standpoint. Today, we’ll dive in to a series of reports on CBD in regards to sleep and wakefulness. These come courtesy of the University of Campeche and the National Autonomous University of Mexico, which teamed with well-known Israeli cannabis researcher Raphael Mechoulam. In the first study, researchers began by implanting EEG monitors in the brains of rodents. These allowed them to use electrical signals to know what phases of sleep rodents were in, as well as make…

The Endocannabinoid System Part II

In the last article we guided you through the history of modern medicine’s understanding of the endocannabinoid system. We were met with a rather strange surprise ending for both the scientific and medical cannabis communities. Put simply, the focus of the entire medical cannabis movement had been cannabis itself; the plant and medicines produced via refining that plant. Yet, the underlying reason that cannabis is such an effective medicine is found in the body’s own endocannabinoid system. This system is activated not only through externally applied exocannabinoids, such as those in smoked or vaporized cannabis, but also the body’s own naturally-produced endocannabinoids, and finally by artificially produced cannabinoid receptor activators. The star of the show is not cannabis at all but the endocannabinoid system, which is activated through numerous pathways. Cannabis just happens to have been mankind’s first interaction with being able to affect, manipulate, and repair the body’s own endocannabinoid system. In that way, humans are very lucky for this unlikely intersection of evolution, where a chemical group a plant produces for its own benefit coincides with a chemical group that the human body uses to regulate itself. The cannabis plant still remains one of the cheapest and most energy efficient ways to produce cannabinoids that would require more complex and costly resources to produce in a laboratory setting. Because of this efficiency, the cannabis plant will likely continue to play a large role in the medical community even after more direct, more controllable means of directing the endocannabinoid…