Update on MS Treatment: The P13K Pathway

We’re living in exciting times; human knowledge of cannabis, cannabinoids, and the endocannabinoid system is surging. If the sheer number of medical journal papers related to cannabis/cannabinoids is any indication, more researchers than ever are choosing to invest their lives and energy in exploring the subject. This, in turn, has allowed individual threads of research to unfold much more rapidly. As would be expected, the findings of one seemingly unrelated study often inform and develop the findings and questions of another. One such thread is that of MS (multiple sclerosis) treatment. We’ve written previously about the concept of using cannabinoids and the endocannabinoid system to treat MS (multiple sclerosis). For readers seeking a full recap, check out the links below: https://cornerstonecollective.com/real-life-cannabinoid-treatment-multiple-sclerosis/ https://cornerstonecollective.com/how-cannabinoids-can-beneficially-interact-with-neurodegenerative-disorder-treatment/ For readers that would rather a digested version, the basic idea is that the endocannabinoid system can control and alleviate inflammation by reducing the number of inflammatory molecules produced by the body. MS, in particular, is a disease in which the body’s immune system becomes confused and starts destroying healthy cells in the brain. If the brain can be pictured as a giant mass of neurons wired together in a network, MS destroys the outer lining of those wires, causing electrical signals to be released improperly or not at all. This process, at the time being, is not reversible or curable but is capable of being slowed. Patients with MS can live long lives, albeit with increasing disability and discomfort. Previous studies have shown that cannabinoids, in particular…

Real Life Cannabinoid Treatment for Multiple Sclerosis

As a blog concerned with new developments in cannabinoid science, we tend to do a lot of writing about future treatments, or new scientific developments that may eventually lead to treatments. Part of the issue is that large-scale, clinical testing of new cannabinoid based medicine is still years away in a lot of areas, particularly in cancer-related fields. That’s why reading a good, new large-scale study is always exhilarating. In this case, a recent study from the University of Bari in Italy took a look at a large scale, real-world application of a THC/CBD oral spray in treating adults with treatment-resistant Multiple Sclerosis (MS). In the past, we’ve written about treating MS models via lab mice with THC and CBD, and also the theory behind that treatment. So being able to finally see how things play out in real life with real patients is particularly rewarding for us and is yet another confirmation of the efficacy of cannabis based treatments. To review, MS is an auto-immune disease in which the body’s immune system is confused into turning against the body and attacking cells. In particular, MS is caused by the immune system stripping neurons of their outer protective linings, which normally prevent “signals” from being crossed or lost in the brain, both for conscious and unconscious tasks. This stripping eventually results in loss of physical mobility and function and can prevent patients from fulfilling active, healthy lives. Spasticity, which affects about 2/3rds of patients, is particularly problematic. Unfortunately, at this…

How Cannabinoids Can Beneficially Interact with Neurodegenerative Disorder Treatment

Neuroinflammation is known to play a significant role in essentially all neurodegenerative processes. Diseases such as Alzheimer’s, Multiple Sclerosis (MS), Huntington’s Disease, and Parkinson’s Disease all involve hyperactive microglia, which are the live-in macrophages of the brain, spinal cord, and central nervous system. Macrophages are immune cells that capture and dissolve foreign substances, germs, and cancer cells within the body. The microglia in the brain and spinal cord form the first line of immune defense in the central nervous system. Unfortunately, in the case of aforementioned diseases, these cells have become overactive causing them to secrete excess substances, such as cytokines (cell signals that regulate cell group growth and response), glutamate, and harmful free radicals. This excessive production of chemicals causes inflammation, which leads to further cell death. Cannabis and the family of chemicals it produces are known to act on two major cell receptor types named CB1 and CB2 respectively. The CB1 receptor is most commonly found in neurons throughout the brain. The psychedelic effects of cannabis come from this receptor’s function, which re-wires the way neurons signal each other. The CB2 receptor on the other hand, is found throughout the body, especially within the immune system cells. The effects of activating the CB2 receptor are more myriad, but within the immune system specifically four groups of effects have been identified: 1. induction of apoptosis or forced cell death 2. suppression of cell proliferation 3. induction of regulatory T cells 4. inhibition of pro-inflammatory cytokine/chemokine production and increase in…