Cannabis Synergy: Beyond THC

Cannabis is a plant as ubiquitous as it is therapeutic. For centuries Cannabis has held an integral role in many societies as a medicine and as a relaxant. A century ago, Cannabis extracts were used in the United States as a normalizer for disruptions in appetite and for cases of nausea, amongst their plethora of other alleviative properties. Since the early twentieth century, reports of Cannabis use turned to an anecdotal form due to the social controversy over the psychoactivity of Cannabis and the scheduling of Cannabis on the controlled substance list. Since then, illicit use continued, with anecdotes of profound therapeutic potential. The diversity of therapeutic effects attributed to Cannabis is staggering. Reports encompass relief from gastrointestinal disruption and illness, decrease in ocular pressure, analgesia, and normalizing depression to list just a few. This wide range of purported medical benefit is unlikely to be attributed to merely one psychoactive compound, the notorious delta-9 THC. THC may be accredited to a large variety of therapeutic benefit, but the variance in psychoactivity seen between strains invites the theory that these variances are caused by different relative ratios of THC to the other cannabinoids, and perhaps even more importantly, the terpenoids. Contrary to the omnipresent terpenoids, phytocannabinoids are produced exclusively in Cannabis. Their involvement with the endocannabinoid receptor system in humans has been an intriguing mystery, with theories such as the surreptitious mimic and others that are beyond the scope of this review (for more information, refer to the National Insitute of…

Cannabinoid-Opioid Interaction in Chronic Pain, A Review

Everyone knows that cannabis delivers various medical benefits, perhaps the most important one being pain relief.  Other drugs relieve pain, and doctors normally prescribe opiates or opioids to relieve severe pain.  However, opioid side effects include sedation, nausea and vomiting, and addiction. Nevertheless, the medical and cannabis communities have good cause to learn more about the combined use of cannabis and opioids.  Research has shown that cannabis enhances the pain relief of opioids while reducing nausea (Narang, 2008).  Patients may benefit from the cannabis-opioid combination by being able to reduce their use of the opioids and the side effects they cause.  Many patients already augment their opioid pain relief regimen with cannabis, so the interaction deserves close examination. For some patients, psychoactivity poses the most serious side effect of cannabis.  Beyond that, patients can safely obtain pain relief from cannabis precisely because it has few other side effects.  The inherent safety of THC is due to the scarcity of cannabinoid receptors in the parts of the brain that control metabolism and breathing. In 2010, Dr. Donald Abrams conducted a study using 24 patients at the San Francisco General Hospital.  The patients normally consumed morphine or oxycodone for significant pain due to various conditions (cancer, multiple sclerosis, migraine, etc.).  The study examined the subjective effects on the patients following the addition of inhaled cannabis vapor to their opioid regimen.  The patients inhaled vaporized cannabis three times a day for five days.  The patients also continued their prescriptions of sustained release tablets…