Vaping To Relieve Pain, Does It Really Work?

One of the most popular recurring topics on the Cornerstone blog is pain management, and for good reason; currently available pain treatment options may go a long way toward reducing pain, but most individuals with chronic pain still report unmet treatment needs. One relevant issue is that multiple sources contribute to pain, and therefore, a single “magic bullet” pain medication does not exist that is capable of treating all sources. As medical science advances, part of researchers’ collective job is elucidating what other pain treatments might be effective and worth adding to the rotation of commonly used painkillers. As readers know, researchers have identified both THC and CBD as potential pain treatments, with CBD’s anti-inflammatory effects making it an especially good candidate for pain stemming from inflammation (such as in arthritis). Cannabinoids such as CBD represent a great treatment option because abuse potential is relatively non-existent. Opiate-based medicines on the other hand, such as morphine, must be carefully controlled. Doctors are frequently put in the position of evaluating a patient’s pain and choosing whether to prescribe opiates or to withhold that medication to prevent abuse, addiction, and drug trading. That decision can be difficult, and the more non-abusable drugs in a doctor’s arsenal, the more likely pain will be treated effectively. Lately, as medical research delves deeper into the world of cannabinoids and the body’s own endocannabinoid system, the emerging consensus is that new cannabinoids could be created that are even more effective at reducing pain than cannabis itself. For…

Vaporization Part III

Have you ever wondered if you were getting the most out of your vaporizer? Perhaps you’re curious about how long vapor can be stored without losing potency? Unfortunately these simple questions can be difficult to answer because vaporizer companies often don’t provide technical research on the subject; careful medical testing of cannabis vaporization devices is uncommon. Yet, as vaporizers grow in popularity and cannabis becomes more culturally mainstream, information is becoming increasingly available. One prominent figure in the medical cannabis research movement, Arno Hazekamp, from the University of Leiden in Holland, focuses on answering very practical questions with sophisticated, quantitative methods. His text, Extracting the Medicine, will be the basis of reviewing functionality of vaporizers in this article. Perhaps the most widespread, non-portable vaporizer design is the balloon-based model. This design catches vapor produced in a temperature-safe bag, referred to as a “balloon”. The balloon adds a significant functionality to any vaporization system. Most apparent, of course, is the ability to de-tether oneself from the source of heat or vaporization. However, the true benefit of the balloon is the ability to breathe at any rate or in any fashion comfortable for the patient. In addition, the vapor in a balloon is typically cooler in temperature than that of a whip or pen style, which many patients prefer. Quality of vapor is determined by both the amount of medicine present in the vapor, as well as the distribution of that medicine or how consistent the vapor is. The ideal vaporizer reaches…